Tag Archives: McDonald’s

Stories from behind the fast food counter

Hilarious Reddit chain about fast food. Some people dish out all their restaurant’s secrets. Others recount horror stories. Read it.

Subway

“This one girl cut herself while making my sandwich, and thought I wouldnt notice, she just covered the wound with her thumb. When it started to drip near my sandwich I said “No. Im not paying for that, go clean up, get a band-aid, Put your gloves back on and we’ll try again.” She acted all annoyed like it wasn’t such a big deal and I should be blessed she decided to drip her special blood sauce on my chicken sammich. Other than that one experience, I love Subway.”

“When I worked at Subway, it was 3 olives per 6 inches. Same for tomatoes. They have all of these precise quantities.”

Wendy’s

Not really a health concern but most people are surprised when I tell them about Wendy’s Chili. The meat comes from hamburger patties that sat on the grill too long to serve to customers. They take them and put them in a bin and then throw them in the fridge. When the chili is made they take it out, boil it, chop it up, and dump them in the chili. It’s all safe, but a lot of people seemed upset when I told them about it.

Five Guys

If there’s anybody scared about Five Guys, it’s fine. There’s no freezer. The burgers are made from slabs of raw meat the day of or the day before. Fries are made every day from the potatoes you see stacked up.

3rmlylAll of the toppings are fresh except for mushrooms. They come in sealed bags. But nothing is notoriously gross.

One thing I will say is that ordering a large fry is always a bad idea. The difference between a large fry and a regular fry is surprisingly small (especially when it’s busy). Just order two regular fries and you’ll get a huge number of fries.

Pizza

Not fast food, but I used to work in an Italian restaurant that made a lot of pizza. Try to avoid “quirky” pizza toppings, such as green olives, meatballs, spinach, artichokes, sauerkraut, sun-dried tomatoes, etc. Basically anything that’s not on any of the pre-set specialty pizzas offered.

In general, the food handling was about the same as any other restaurant, but the issue with these toppings is there just isn’t enough turnover. The ingredients are purchased in bulk, just like pepperoniimages or black olives, but they aren’t ordered frequently enough to be replaced once they’re no longer “fresh”. They’ll be replaced before they’re actually rotten, but that’s a long time after they’re considered unfit for consumption, particularly at a nicer restaurant.

McDonalds

“I don’t work there anymore and things are probably different now but when i worked at McDonalds i accidentally left a whole bag of about 100 chicken nuggets out on a counter for way too long.

They melted. Into a pool of liquid. I never understood why. But they were completely indiscernible as being the nuggets i once knew.

Had to make myself a twenty piece just to get over the sight of the nugget pool. Still delicious.”

“McDonalds sweet tea. Pound. Of. Sugar. Per gallon.”

“The restaurant I worked at put roughly 3 pounds of sugar in every urn (an urn is 3 gallons? 5? Something like that). We filled a tea pitcher with sugar and dumped it in. We still had people put simple syrup in the tea to make it sweeter.”

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The true cost of unhealthy eating

A ferocious hunger gripped me as I looked inside of my bag for the salad I brought to work.

Damn! I had forgotten it on the kitchen table.

I work at a TV station, which requires more time out in the field doing interviews and covering events and less time sitting in a chair staring at a computer screen three steps away from a vending machine.

Since I started the paleo diet, I continued my healthy eating at work, packing a lunch, usually salad topped with homemade chicken salad and some almonds and spanish peanuts as a snack throughout the day. I noticed how much energy I had, how, even when I was hungry, I could still go, go, go. I was less cranky, more focused. My mind seemed less clouded.

Before I started the paleo diet, I would sit at a desk after lunch and get that”2:30 feeling” that is advertised on 5 hour energy drink commercials. My eyes would droop, my mind would wander, the front of my face would feel numb with sleepiness.

Unfortunately, the day I forgot my salad, the photographer and I stopped at Krystals on the way to an interview. I devoured three Krystal “chicks” which are chicken sandwich sliders. I thought the chicken was grilled, but it was fried. The sandwich was more bread and mayo than anything else.

I had instant satisfaction after I ate the “chicks.” Tummy full, I felt high off of my first bite of bread in several months.

Then it hit me like a ton of bricks; That 2:30 feeling. I fought to stay awake on the thirty minute drive to the interview. My mind seemed unclear, my thoughts would start and then trickle away into drowsiness. This was a feeling I hadn’t felt since the start of my diet.

I felt disgusting. This “food” I ate could hardly be called fuel. Yet people eat it everyday.

“Every day, 2.2 million Americans complain of being tired,” according to WebMD.

This is why.

Combined with alcohol and tobacco usage and not enough sleep, diet not only affects your waist size, it affects your mood.

It is a shackle that gratifies you instantly, addicts you, then abuses you.

“At least one-quarter of American adults eat fast food everyday,” Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation, said in an interview with CBS.

 “In 1970, Americans spent about $6 billion on fast food; in 2000, they spent more than $110 billion. Americans now spend more money on fast food than on higher education, personal computers, computer software, or new cars. They spend more on fast food than on movies, books, magazines, newspapers, videos, and recorded music – combined,” he writes in Fast Food Nation.

Americans like it fast, easy and fried. But it is killing us.

About one-third of U.S. adults are overweight. But more shocking is that approximately 17% (or 12.5 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years are obese, according the CDC.

An adult can make the choice to consume foods that are blatantly bad for them. But now, the younger generation is suffering because of the choice of the parents.

A study done by The New England Journal of Medicine reports that for the first time in two centuries, the current generation of children in America may have shorter life expectancies than their parents.

A McDonalds value menu cheeseburger may only cost $1. But  this is the true cost of unhealthy eating.

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Filed under Alcohol, Feature, Features, Food, Health, News, Opinion, Paleo Diet, People, Personal

Facebook community shocked by picture of chicken

Night before last I posted a delicious looking picture on Facebook of a pizza I made, using cauliflower for the crust. Within minutes I had two Facebook messages asking me for the recipe and another comment asking for it. 

When I made cinnamon chicken and posted a picture, the same thing happened in the form of two comments.

Looks like my Facebook friends are interested in good looking food and good tasting food. But good food can be healthy and alternative. In fact, it’s the mainstream restaurants and corporations that are duping us into eating food that has gone through so many processes, that it’s not really even food anymore.

Today I am pleased to get on Facebook and see this rather unusual looking picture being circulated. It looks like a gigantic spiral of play-doe that is being folded into a box. Can you guess what it is?

 For years McDonald’s has had a bad rep for their fatty foods. Documentaries like “Super Size Me” have sought to combat its grossly unhealthy menu. In this picture is what the chicken nuggets from McDonald’s used to be made of until 2010, according to a 2010 Huffington Post articleMany frozen chicken nuggets at the grocery store and other meat products are still made out of this paste. So what is this mush exactly?

It is mechanically separated chicken.

Ok…so what exactly is that?

“Mechanically separated poultry is a paste-like and batter-like poultry product produced by forcing bones, with attached edible tissue, through a sieve or similar device under high pressure to separate bone from the edible tissue. Mechanically separated poultry has been used in poultry products since the late 1960’s. In 1995, a final rule on mechanically separated poultry said it was safe and could be used without restrictions. However, it must be labeled as “mechanically separated chicken or turkey” in the product’s ingredients statement,” according to the USDA.

The real story as explained in the HuffPost article, which they got from Fooducate:

“Someone figured out in the 1960s that meat processors can eek out a few more percent of profit from chickens, turkeys, pigs, and cows by scraping the bones 100% clean of meat. This is done by machines, not humans, by passing bones leftover after the initial cutting through a high pressure sieve. The paste you see in the picture above is the result.”

“There’s more: because it’s crawling with bacteria, it will be washed with ammonia… Then, because it tastes gross, it will be reflavored artificially. Then, because it is weirdly pink, it will be dyed with artificial color.

But, hey, at least it tastes good, right?

High five, America!”

On Tuesday, Deb Mahan posted the picture on Facebook. So far it has generated 7 likes, 3,261 shares. Although she explains the process of mechanically separated chicken accurately, she wrongly says it is still in McDonald’s nuggets.

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