Tag Archives: low carb

The true cost of unhealthy eating

A ferocious hunger gripped me as I looked inside of my bag for the salad I brought to work.

Damn! I had forgotten it on the kitchen table.

I work at a TV station, which requires more time out in the field doing interviews and covering events and less time sitting in a chair staring at a computer screen three steps away from a vending machine.

Since I started the paleo diet, I continued my healthy eating at work, packing a lunch, usually salad topped with homemade chicken salad and some almonds and spanish peanuts as a snack throughout the day. I noticed how much energy I had, how, even when I was hungry, I could still go, go, go. I was less cranky, more focused. My mind seemed less clouded.

Before I started the paleo diet, I would sit at a desk after lunch and get that”2:30 feeling” that is advertised on 5 hour energy drink commercials. My eyes would droop, my mind would wander, the front of my face would feel numb with sleepiness.

Unfortunately, the day I forgot my salad, the photographer and I stopped at Krystals on the way to an interview. I devoured three Krystal “chicks” which are chicken sandwich sliders. I thought the chicken was grilled, but it was fried. The sandwich was more bread and mayo than anything else.

I had instant satisfaction after I ate the “chicks.” Tummy full, I felt high off of my first bite of bread in several months.

Then it hit me like a ton of bricks; That 2:30 feeling. I fought to stay awake on the thirty minute drive to the interview. My mind seemed unclear, my thoughts would start and then trickle away into drowsiness. This was a feeling I hadn’t felt since the start of my diet.

I felt disgusting. This “food” I ate could hardly be called fuel. Yet people eat it everyday.

“Every day, 2.2 million Americans complain of being tired,” according to WebMD.

This is why.

Combined with alcohol and tobacco usage and not enough sleep, diet not only affects your waist size, it affects your mood.

It is a shackle that gratifies you instantly, addicts you, then abuses you.

“At least one-quarter of American adults eat fast food everyday,” Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation, said in an interview with CBS.

 “In 1970, Americans spent about $6 billion on fast food; in 2000, they spent more than $110 billion. Americans now spend more money on fast food than on higher education, personal computers, computer software, or new cars. They spend more on fast food than on movies, books, magazines, newspapers, videos, and recorded music – combined,” he writes in Fast Food Nation.

Americans like it fast, easy and fried. But it is killing us.

About one-third of U.S. adults are overweight. But more shocking is that approximately 17% (or 12.5 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years are obese, according the CDC.

An adult can make the choice to consume foods that are blatantly bad for them. But now, the younger generation is suffering because of the choice of the parents.

A study done by The New England Journal of Medicine reports that for the first time in two centuries, the current generation of children in America may have shorter life expectancies than their parents.

A McDonalds value menu cheeseburger may only cost $1. But  this is the true cost of unhealthy eating.

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Top 10 worst foods

Couldn’t have said it better myself!!!!

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Hidden sugars likened to “silent killers”

By Amber James

Originally posted on the Gargolye

Graphic by Amber James

Think you might have room for dessert after dinner tonight? Think again.

Although many people can look at a nutrition label and see just how much sugar it takes to make a treat sweet, there is a cloaked reality with bitter consequences. It’s called hidden sugars.

Flagler student Michelle Coark took her best guess at what hidden sugars are. “Is it a natural sugar,” she said.

Hidden sugars, or added sugars, are quite the opposite of Coark’s guess. They are sugars that don’t occur naturally in foods.

The FDA doesn’t require companies to post the added sugars on the nutrition label. Instead they are slipped into the ingredients list under strange names that the average consumer might not recognize.

Any word ending in “ose” should be a red flag, such as sucrose, glucose, lactose and fructose.

Words ending in “ol” are also  sugar synonyms, like sorbitol, xylitol, mannitol and maltitol.

Since the FDA doesn’t regulate how the sugars are grouped, many advertising companies are getting away with stretching the truth and using buzzwords like “no sugar” or “no calories” to trick the consumer into thinking a product is healthier than it really is.

Many energy drinks claim to have zero sugars. 5-Hour Energy is one of these, but listed as “other ingredients” on its nutrition label are sweeteners glycerin and sucrose.

Coke Zero also markets itself as a zero calorie, zero sugar drink, but it still contains the artificial sweeteners aspartame and acesulfame k.

Coark, an English major, said she thinks the FDA should require companies to distinguish between the different sugars and keep track of the grams on a nutrition label.

“It’s like how they made cigarette [companies] put the warning label on [the package],” she said. “It’s kind of the same thing, like a silent killer.”

But a few extra grams everyday can really add up. And it adds up to spoonfuls. Americans consume about 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day.

A woman’s caloric intake should be around 2,000 calories a day. The average woman consumes 25 percent of those calories a day in added sugars. These are empty calories that she may not even know she’s consuming.

“Fructose, sucrose, all those “oses” and you think, ‘Oh my God,’ I am consuming so much sugar. It’s crazy,” Allison Dozier, a student at Santa Fe College in Gainesville, said.

Still, she said she really doesn’t care about what is in her food, and she doesn’t think a lot of college students really have time to care either.

“Papers come before eating,” she said.

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My attempt at Baba-Ghanoush

I’ve been dying to try out this Baba-Ghanoush recipe from paleolifestyle.com, which is where I get a lot of my recipes. BG is an arabic dip similar to hummus.

I didn’t have eggplants last time I wanted to make it, so I made it using cucumbers instead. It was an excellent dip, very good for a veggie tray or a spread on a sandwich.

Baba Ghanoush

Baba-Ghanoush:

Serves 8

Ingredients

  • 2 large eggplants;
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced;
  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice;
  • 2 tbsp tahini (optional);
  • 3 tsp extra virgin olive oil;
  • 1 tsp cumin (optional);
  • Salt and pepper to taste;
  • Fresh parsley, optional, for garnishing.

Technique

  1. To roast the eggplants, either use your grill, the open flame of a gas stove or your oven. If using an open flame, keep the eggplant near the flame and turn them often to darken the skin evenly. If using your stove, prick the skin with a fork and roast for about 35 minutes in a 400 F oven.
  2. Put the roasted eggplants in a bowl of cold water, wait a bit and then peel off the skin.
  3. Place the roasted eggplant, garlic, lemon juice, tahini, olive oil, cumin in a blender and blend until smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  4. Cool in the refrigerator and serve with extra olive oil on top and fresh parsley.

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Flaws with the paleo diet according to a fat loss coach

Although I try and stay as close to the paleo diet as possible, I’ve often wondered what was so bad about rice since it has been a food staple in the East for a very long time.

Tom Venuto, a weight loss coach, wrote an interesting article about the flaws of the paleo diet. I can’t say I agree or disagree, more research is needed, but I do like to read articles for and against the paleo diet.

I do understand where he is coming from and appreciate his input. I didn’t like where he got preachy, however:

“If you really want to be 100% like a cave man, why not ditch your car and your computer too, because that will certainly get you off your butt more won’t it? Heck, ditch your electricity and your refrigerator while you’re at it because that would be on the same level of thinking as universally condemining all natural carbs for the sake of being more “paleo.”

He’s completely off the mark there. Electricity isn’t hurting my body. And I am responsible enough to offset office and school activities that often have me sedentary by starting my day with a trip to the gym.

 

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